Kids and Divorce
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If you divorce, what can you do to minimize the problems your children face?
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Try to resolve your conflicts with your former spouse, or at least keep them private. Come to some type of agreement, and if you can't agree, at least keep your differences out of your interactions with your child. Don't criticize or blame the other parent, and don't use your child to manipulate your former spouse's behavior. For  example, don't have your child deliver messages and criticisms: Discuss issues directly.
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Work on having a caring, supportive relationship with your child. Address fears openly. Your child maybe worried about where he or she will spend most of the week, or whether he or she will ever get to see the noncustodial parent. Separate marital and parenting matters, and make this difference clear to your child: "These are the issues that involve you."
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Take advantage of whatever family and social support systems are available. Look for support groups and family counseling. There are groups specifically for kids of divorced parents. Contact social service agencies, your child's school counselor, favorite teacher or principal, or your clergyman for information about resources in your area.
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